Sunday, May 7, 2017

10 Tips for Picking Paint Colors


10 Tips for Picking Paint Colors

Why do we find one place appealing and are uneasy in another? Why are we attracted to one product over another? Color—whether architectural or in products—accounts for 60 percent of our response to an object or a place.
The "buzz" about color is usually called "color psychology." But the effects of color are subtle and significant; physical and psychological. Color use is not something that results in a definitive equation between "color and our moods," as is a currently popular expression. Wherever we go we respond to color, but the importance of color is often underestimated. Color use is important to us personally in our homes and in the places where we work.

Popular Videos: Picking Paint Colors 7 Videos

Start Small

If you're not sure where to begin with color, experiment in a powder room or bathroom, a small hall or area between rooms, or an accent wall. If you're doing your own painting, pick an area that's quick to do so you can see your results sooner, and be happy with it or change it. Look at the process as an adventure.
To get started, select a favorite color drawn from artwork, a rug, dishes and an accessory or furniture piece as a main color or accent.

Think About Your Mood

When selecting a color, consider the mood of a room. In a bedroom do you want the feeling to be restful and soothing or dramatic and intimate? Soft, cool colors and neutrals usually create a quieter feeling while stronger colors are for drama.
Do you want a dining area to feel sociable and stimulating or appear formal and quiet? Warmer, contrasting and somewhat brighter colors add to a sociable atmosphere; deeper blue-greens and neutrals will give a more formal ambiance.
Do you want kid's rooms to create an active and exciting energy or an orderly and restful feeling? Be careful not to overstimulate your children with intensely bright hues. You may not know it, but some brighter colors can lead to unrest and irritability.

Pay Attention to Lighting

The reason why paint stores have light boxes for you to test paint chips:

  • Natural daylight shows the truest color;
  • Incandescent lighting brings out warm tones and yellows;
  • Fluorescent lighting casts a sharp blue tone.
So, a strong color might be too bright and overpowering when used on all walls or next to a large window, but it might be effective when used as an accent wall with indirect light.
Design by Andreas Charalambous

Learn the Color Terms

It helps to understand the terminology used to describe color.

  • Hue is what we call a color. Red is the hue; blue is the hue.
  • The value of the hue is how light or dark it is.
  • Saturation refers to how dominant the hue is. As we go from red to pink, the red hue becomes less dominant.
  • Intensity is the brilliance of the color. The pure colors such as red are more intense than the combined colors such as yellow-green. A stronger intense color usually has a more dominant hue.
If you want a more active space, consider introducing stronger, more intense color. Even if you want a light-colored room, choose colors that are slightly more saturated than off-white or light pastel. Very light color can feel bright and stark when it appears on all surfaces in a room. However, two or more medium-light, closely related pastel colors can create a luminous effect when used in the same room.
Design by Shelly Riehl David

Test Your Color Choice

Boost your confidence by testing colors on poster board or large areas of a wall. Don't be afraid to go beyond your comfort zone: Consider strong, vivid colors or soft, deep neutrals like chocolate brown or olive green as main or accent colors. Or add drama with a stronger color on the ceiling. Tinted ceilings can dramatically change the whole look of a room.
Design by Sherrill Canet

Add Depth With Decorative Finishes

Transform flat, dull walls into interesting and personal spaces with subtle or dramatic visual texture and broken color. Burnished mineral/metal finishes and layered colored glazes add depth. Some examples of softly reflective metals are mica, copper, pewter, bronze and, of course, antiqued silver and gold.
Design by Payton Addison

Walk Into Another Room

Consider walls as planes of color, and see how they interact when viewing one next to the other in adjacent rooms. Approach it like a composition: You're in one room, but you're going to see a piece of another room through it. So as you're choosing colors, consider how they will flow from room to room to create your picture.
Design by Amy Bubier

Follow the Color Wheel

A small color wheel is a great reference tool for modifying and intensifying two or more colors. For example, red and green, which are complementary (opposite) colors, are most intense when used together. You may be surprised at how many combinations function beautifully together, and you may even become attracted to entirely new color palettes. The color wheel also illustrates the visual temperature of a color. Draw a line from the yellow-green mark on the color wheel all the way down to the red-violet; you'll see that all the colors on the left are warm and the colors on the right are cool.
Number one color rule for a small space? There are no rules! Mixing colors can help bring a personal touch to your space.

Play Up Monochromatic Schemes

Think one color is boring? Create bold or subtle variations within one color group with contrasting paint finishes. For example, use closely related colors, or try a single color in different finishes, for walls and trim in one space.
For an accent color, select a warmer (more toward reds) or cooler (more toward blues) color to complement your main color group. For a quieter ambience, make sure your colors are not extremely bright. White or an off-white tint can be a striking accent when used as trim with a monochromatic color group.
Design by Nicole Sassaman

Choose Different Paint Finishes

A single color used on walls and trim takes on new significance when applied in different finishes. For example, wall and trim colors can remain the same hue, but use an eggshell (matte and less reflective) finish on walls and a satin or semigloss on trim. The color will appear slightly different on each surface. It's a good way to create a cohesive look in rooms with many windows and doors, and relatively little wall area.
Design by Lori Dennis

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Paint Color and Decorating Tips

Quick changes with paint make your home sparkle during the holidays and every day.

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Paint expert Debbie Zimmer offers painting contractors and homeowners suggestions on how to create a festive atmosphere for the holidays — and all year 'round — to every room.
Add a glossy frame. Artwork is always improved with the addition of a beautiful frame, and your wall space is no different. Update a room by adding color and shine to trim work and doors — the "frame" around the room. Highlight these areas with semi-gloss or gloss paint in a complementary hue to the wall color. Glossy finishes add sparkle and interest, and assist in differentiating one space from another. They also provide the added benefit of durability and long-lasting wear, especially in busy family gathering spaces.
Take a color cue from holiday gift bags. Incorporating several colors into a space is often a stumbling block for many do-it-yourselfers. By simply perusing the gift bag aisle, you'll find exciting and unusual combinations that are often easily transferable to your space. This tip works especially well when contemplating hues for tweens and teens.
Look up and celebrate the ceilings. Let the ceilings sparkle. Add shine and sophistication to dining spaces by painting these often bland areas with a high sheen product. If you are not quite ready to change your entire ceiling, add a stencil pattern in a glossy hue for a touch of high style.
Texture, texture, texture. Integrate texture into a space for added interest and appeal. "When working with a monochromatic or single color scheme, wall texture will provide depth and warmth," Zimmer says. The addition of bead board, paintable wall coverings or glazing over an already painted surface will provide subtle interest and a three-dimensional appearance.
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Materials:
Natural sea sponge
Satin paint (base coat: Kilim Beige SW6106; top coat: Antique White SW6119) – Sherwin-Williams
Paintbrushes
Blue painter's tape
Craft knife
Long level
Pencil
2-1/2" sash brush

Steps:

1. Apply the base coat and let dry. Use a long level and a pencil to mark vertical lines of uneven widths (four, five and six inches) around the room. Cut the painter's tape into narrower pieces and tape-off along the edge of the lines, leaving the pencil marks exposed to be covered by white paint.
2. Dip a sash brush into white paint and brush the excess off onto paper towels. Pull the brush down along the wall, going right over the tape.
3. Add more white paint using a damp sea sponge, pulling it down the wall from ceiling to floor, keeping it as straight as possible and using the tape as a guideline. Once the walls are dry, add the extra peeled and chipped paint look by pouncing more of the taupe color here and there. Note: It's best to finish one wall at a time, keeping a wet edge, and then stop to remove the tape.
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Choosing Wall Colors and Wall Paint Tips

Find tips for choosing the right wall colors and wall paint from the experts at HGTV.com.

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Pull a color out of something else that is going to be in the room such as the chosen fabrics. Narrow down two or three and purchase a quart of each to paint sample boards (while no one wants to buy paint they won't use, this can keep you from buying gallons of the wrong color). Hold the dry sample boards up to the furniture, the fabrics and the surfaces already in the room (the larger swatch makes it so much easier to decide if a color is right or not).
If the choice between two colors is difficult, set one of the boards up and hide the other behind it. If you cannot commit, switch the boards as you will probably feel more comfortable with one. If not, don't worry too much about this as you'll eventually find the right color. Remember, it's just paint.
A perfect match isn't always the best wall color choice so allow at least one of the sample boards to be an imperfect match. It just might be the spark that gives your room that non-formulated designer look.

Paint Color Ideas 01:26

David Bromstad shares some of his best ideas about paint colors.
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Paint Glossary: All About Paint, Color and Tools

Learn what type of paint to use, which tools will work best and the basics for picking color schemes.

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By: Jacquelyn McGilvray

All About Paint

Latex Paint: Often called "acrylic latex" because it contains a plastic resin made of acrylics or polyvinyls to help it adhere better (see Water-Based Paint).
Oil-Based Paint: Commonly used on molding, cabinets and furniture. It provides a protective coating and creates a smoother finish than water-based paint.
To tell whether your current wall color is water- or oil-based, douse a white cloth with rubbing alcohol and rub it on the wall (in an out-of-the-way spot). If the paint softens and begins to transfer onto the cloth, it is water based. If the alcohol does not remove any color, it is oil-based.
Primer: Used to seal bare surfaces and provide a base for paint to grab on to. If you've spackled your walls, priming is a must to prevent the spackle from bleeding through the paint. Use water-based primer on new drywall, previously painted walls (including those that have been patched, repaired or stained), galvanized metal and nonferrous metals. Use oil-based primer on severely stained or damaged walls, on paneling, under wallpaper, and on wrought iron, ferrous metal and raw wood.
Sheen: A paint's sheen gives it a certain finish and quality. There are several options:
Matte/Flat -- Smooth finish, has little or no sheen. Helps hide surface imperfections but may suffer damage more easily than other finishes. Best for low-traffic areas.
Eggshell -- Velvety sheen, easy to clean. Great middle-of-the-road option between flat and high gloss. Gives a flatter look than glossy paint but still provides hard-wearing and protective coating.
Satin -- Silky, pearl-like finish, stain-resistant. Creates protective shell that resists moisture and mildew. Good for kitchens, bathrooms and high-traffic areas.
Semigloss -- Sleek, radiant and high resistance to moisture. Good for cabinets, doors and windows.
High Gloss -- Very durable and easy to clean. Its glass-like finish makes it good for trim and molding.
Water-Based Paint: (Latex paint is often called water-based) Commonly used on walls and ceilings, it is less toxic and easier to clean up than oil-based paints. Water-based paint comes in a variety of sheens including matte, eggshell or high-gloss.
Water-based paint works well on surfaces previously painted with latex or flat oil-base paints. It usually doesn’t adhere well to high-gloss finishes, however, and cannot be used on bare steel because it will rust it. Water-based paint can be used on top of wallpaper, but there is a risk that the water in the paint may cause the paper to peel away from the wall.

Color Basics

Color Wheel: A pie-shaped diagram showing the range and relationship of colors (Image 1).
Complementary Colors: Hues directly opposite each other on the color wheel. For example: green paired with red or orange paired with blue, like this pale blue dining room accompanied by bold orange accents. As the strongest contrasts, complements tend to intensify each other (Image 2).
Harmonious (Analogous) Colors: Three to six colors close together on the color wheel. The shared underlying color generally gives such color schemes a coherent, sophisticated look. Since little variety of color is used, interest has to come from texture, pattern, lighting and accessorizing. This eclectic living room draws in analogous hues of yellow, orange and hints of red to add interest to the space (Image 3).
Hue: Another term for specific points on the pure, clear range of the color wheel.
Primary Colors: Red, blue and yellow. All other colors are derived from these three (Image 1).
Monochromatic: Color schemes that are shades and tints of one color. For example: brown and taupe or shades of blue (Image 2).
Secondary Colors: A mix of two primary colors. For example: violet is made from mixing blue and red, green is made from yellow and blue, and yellow and red combine to make orange (Image 3).
Triad Colors: Three colors that are equally spaced on the color wheel, such as red, yellow and blue or green, orange and violet (Image 1).
Value/Tone: Degree of lightness or darkness of a color. It is determined by adding black to create a shade, white to create a tint, or gray to create a tone. Monochromatic color schemes are shades and tints of one color (Image 2).

Finding the Right Tools

Paintbrushes – Which type is best?: Use a nylon-bristle brush for water-based paint and natural bristles for oil-based paint. Do not use natural bristles with water–based paint, the water can make the bristles limp. Foam brushes are good for intricate work such as painting molding or window casings. These brushes usually last for only one use because they're hard to clean and easy to tear (Image 1).
Paintbrush Shape:
Angled-Sash Paintbrush -- The bristles are cut at an angle to make it easier to cut into corners and paint moldings.
Straight-End Paintbrush -- Straight-end brushes' bristles are cut at the same length (Image 2).
Types of Bristles: The best brushes have bristles that are flagged and tipped. Flagged bristles are slightly split, so they’ll hold more paint and spread it more smoothly. Tipped bristles are slightly tapered to help release an even, controllable amount of paint.
Cleaning Paintbrushes: Use soap and water to clean latex paint off the brush immediately after painting. If the paint dries on the brush, you'll need special solvents to remove it. If your house is on a public sewer system, you can clean the brushes in your sink, but be careful not to dispose of paint in an area where it might seep into the groundwater.
For oil-based paints, you'll need a solvent such as paint thinner or mineral spirits. Pour about two inches of thinner into a metal container and swirl the dirty brush in it until the paint comes off. Press the brush against the side of the container to remove excess thinner and clean off the remaining thinner with a rag, then rinse with soap and water. If oil-based paint dries on your brush, just soak it in thinner for a few minutes before cleaning. Caution: Rags, steel wool, sanding dust or waste soaked with oil-based products may spontaneously catch fire if improperly discarded. Immediately after each use, place rags, steel wool, sanding dust or waste in a sealed, water-filled metal container.
Moist paintbrushes can be wrapped in plastic or waxed paper and sealed with a rubber band or aluminum foil. Hang brushes upside down to maintain their shape (Image 3).
Painting Pads: These can be very useful for cutting around trim. The pads come with small wheels that allow you to paint up to the edge of the trim without getting paint on the trim. To use one, dip the pad face into the paint, being careful not to get paint on the rollers.
Paint Sprayers: There is a wide selection of sprayers available, ranging in size, capabilities and price. No matter which type you use, always wear a dust mask or respirator to protect yourself from fumes (Image 1).
Hand-held airless paint sprayers -- best for staining and for outdoor work, such as painting a fence or sealing a deck. Use only oil-based paint or stain unless it is rated at 45 watts or more.
Airless spray paint roller -- works like a paint roller, without the inconvenience of having to continuously refill your paint tray as you work.
High-volume low-pressure sprayer -- designed for professional finishing jobs, where the control of the spray is important. Good for painting interior walls, exterior jobs and crown or dentil molding. They come with various nozzles that can be used to create special designs. Can use oil- or latex-based paint.
High-pressure, low-volume sprayer -- this sprayer is gravity fed and works with a compressor. It has the capacity to spray a wide variety of finishes, but can overspray and splash back at times.
Diaphragm paint sprayer -- works with five-gallon bucket to provide a continuous supply of paint.
Paint-Sprayer Cleanup: After using latex paint, run water through the sprayer until it's clear. After using oil-based paint, pour paint thinner into the sprayer. It's important to clean the sprayer and nozzles thoroughly because any leftover paint can ruin the machine.
Roller Covers: Paint rollers are great time savers on any paint project. Using the correct roller cover can make your painting a whole lot smoother.
Nap -- The correct nap length of roller cover all depends on the texture of the surface you are painting. For a rough surface, use a roller with a long nap length. For smooth surfaces, use a shorter nap length. For example, on concrete block or stucco use a roller cover with a 3/4" to 1" nap. A 3/8" or 1/2” nap will probably work for most interior wall surfaces and with various sheen levels. A 1/4” nap is too flat and hard for most wall applications (Image 1).
Fiber -- Mohair is good for applying enamel paint. Lambswool covers are excellent for alkyd paints, but not for latex. Synthetic fibers are the most versatile but cannot be used with epoxies and polyurethane (Image 2).
Core -- Cardboard cores are not very durable because they absorb the paint, get soft and often lose their shape. Also, cardboard and many other types of roller covers use glue to hold the fabric to the core. The problem here is that the solvents in paint can cause the glue to dissolve, making the roller fall apart (Image 3).
When selecting a roller frame, look for expandable poles made from heavy-gauge wire, and make sure it has end bearings for smooth operation.
Cleaning Rollers:
For latex paint, scrape as much paint off the roller as possible. Partially fill a sink or large bucket with warm water and roll the applicator back and forth. If necessary, use detergent with the water to remove difficult paint. Rinse the roller until the water is clear. Let dry.
For oil-based paint, scrape as much paint as possible off the roller. Roll the applicator in a paint tray containing mineral spirits or paint thinner then wash the roller in soapy water. Rinse thoroughly and let dry.
Store rollers in clean plastic bags.
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Painting Dos and Don'ts

Follow these helpful hints for your next painting project.

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By: Jennifer Huskey
Related To:

Dos

DO buy a quart first instead of a large quantity in case you're not committed to the color. Paint a piece of foam board and move it around the room to see how the light affects the color at different times of the day.
DO take the time to prep the area. Gather artwork and accessories in one box and place out of the way. Move furniture to the center of the space (or into another room altogether), wipe down walls and tape off molding. Cover the floor with a drop cloth, because plastic sheets can be slippery and messy.
DO remove all of the hardware — switchplates, doorknobs, drapery hardware, etc. — and place the parts in a plastic bag.
DO gather everything you'll need to get the job done and set up a "paint station" in or near the room. Include a paint tray, painters' tape, brushes, rollers, stir sticks, a paint can opener, rags, paint thinner, a screwdriver, hammer and ladder.
DO purchase one good paint tray and line it with inexpensive disposable plastic tray forms. Aluminum foil works well in a pinch.
DO calculate how much paint you'll need. It's always best to get it mixed at one time.
DO choose the appropriate rollers and brushes. Specific rollers are required depending on the paint's viscosity (i.e. how well it rolls onto the surface) and the wall's texture. Brushes with angled tips are best for painting on and around trim.
DO wear appropriate clothing (you will get paint on you somewhere) and slip-on shoes for easy access in and out of the room.
DO prime the walls if going from one extreme color to another. For instance, if the walls are tan and you want deep green, paint first with a primer tinted to match your intended top coat to ensure you'll end up with the true color.
DO expect to apply at least three coats when painting walls red — one coat of primer and two coats of paint.
DO keep a stash of paint for touch-ups in a small plastic cup or glass jar, like margarine containers or baby food jars (thoroughly cleaned, of course). Be sure to label each container with the color and brand name.
DO keep inexpensive foam and artists' brushes (dollar-store variety) on hand for touch-ups on trim and hard-to-reach spots.

Don'ts

DON'T rush. You'll achieve the best results if you practice a little patience. Plan on making it a full-day affair and you won't get frustrated.
DON'T pour the paint from the can until you notch holes into the paint can rim. Simply hammer holes around the metal rim with a nail to create holes for the paint to drip back down into the can.
DON'T paint out of order — start with the ceiling, then walls, doors and woodwork and finish with the floor.
DON'T apply latex on an oil finish and vice versa without first sanding the walls (remember to wear a mask) and wiping away the dust particles with a tack cloth. Apply a primer of the same composition (oil or latex) of the intended topcoat.
DON'T paint directly over wallpaper. If possible, remove it all with a steamer or paper-removing solution and prime. If it's old and not coming off, remove the loose pieces (repair with joint compound to smooth out the surface), sand and wipe with a tack cloth, then prime.
DON'T close off the room. Keep doors and windows open to allow for proper ventilation.
DON'T underestimate how long it'll take you to get the job done. Allow at least 24 hours to dry before bringing everything back into the room. Allow two weeks to 30 days to cure before washing or wiping.
DON'T put off cleaning your brush and rollers if you plan to use them again.
DON'T dispose of paint irresponsibly. Check your area for local hazardous waste recycling centers.
DON'T reattach the lid without cleaning the rim of the can. Also, to further prevent inadvertent splatters, place a paper towel or rag on top of the lid, then hammer to secure
Source: HGTV
TOCON Pro Painters
http://www.tocon.ca

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